A blog focusing beyond the 4/4 side of Electronic music. We post a wide ranging selection of sounds, including latest releases, overlooked recent material, and the occasional throw-back. Contact generic.people.blog@gmail.com for more information.

Big Room Tech House Dj Tool – TIP! by Joy Orbison



We couldn’t not post this one. Enjoy.

&Fate by Boddika & Joy Orbison


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We’ll let the music talk here; dance-floors get ready to be slayed.

Top 50 Tunes of 2012: Ten to one

Here it is - our top ten tunes for 2012. While a lot of them you probably predicted, we hope there’s still a few surprises thrown into the mix. Any you think we missed? Hit us up on Facebook or Twitter and post us yours. A massive thanks to everyone who read the blog, producers who did Generic Casts and interviews for us, and anyone else who contributed. We look forward to seeing you all again in the new year.

1. Ensemble (Club Mix) by Girl Unit


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Night Slugs seemed to be one of the few UK based labels who weren’t completely swept up by Techno in 2012, and while we’re not criticizing this current Techno obsession - quite the opposite in fact, it’s always nice to see people doing their own thing (ya know?). Girl Unit (aka Philip Gamble) has never been one to release large quantities of material in a year, but in 2012 Gamble took this ethos further, releasing only the Club Rez EP. Though what a release it is, with six originals that we found difficult to separate - particularly this cut and the title track. Ultimately however, ‘Ensemble’ came out on top, with the combination of 80s Funk inspired synth and that bassline simply too much. A well deserved number one.


2.
Dun Dun by Boddika & Joy O


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Okay, so ‘Swims’ might have seemed like the natural choice here, but ultimately the GP crew agreed that ‘Dun Dun’ was just that little bit more enjoyable. Starting off rather sinisterly, the track builds up into happier, more floor-friendly territory. Boddika and Joy O had a momentous year together (as well as individually), putting out three releases - all of which of the absolute highest quality. Their rise from underground stars to broader acclaim has never been more obvious than throughout this year, and we can only imagine what 2013 will bring. Dun dun.

3. Untitled by Pearson Sound


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Coming out as a sneaky white label release in March, the Untitled / Footloose 12” was considerably less hyped than the Clutch 12” which followed on the more prestigious Hessle imprint - the label David Kennedy (aka Pearson Sound) helps run. Despite this, it’s ‘Untitled’ which we’ve selected for third place on our list. Why? Because it showcases Kennedy’s sound perfectly - that signature percussion, a relatively simple synth element, and finally a repetitive vocal cut. It may not sound like a lot, but combined they form absolute perfection, and a track that will long remain on repeat in the GP office.

4.
Child by George FitzGerald


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If you’d said at the start of the year that George FitzGeralad was going to lay down a classic Chicago House inspired joint in 2012, you’d probably have raised a few eyebrows. FitzGerald is well known for developing a lush vibe throughout much of his output, but “floor-filler” isn’t generally a term used to describe his tracks. However, with ‘Child’ he created just that - a bouncy House jam complete with soulful male vocals, bangin’ synths, and memorable claps. We suggest speeding this one up a little for ultimate effect.

5.
Why They Hide Their Bodies Under My Garage by Blawan


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It seemed near impossible for Blawan (that’s Jamie Roberts to his moms), to possibly top his 2011, yet somehow he’s managed. Coming out on Joy Orbison and Will Bankhead’s - of Trilogy Tapes fame, Hinge Finger imprint, His He She & She has proven to be one of the biggest releases for 2012. ‘Why They Hide Their Bodies Under My Garage’ really exemplifies the thriving UK Techno scene of current - like only Roberts could do, and duly creating a particularly evil anthem in the process. Anyone lucky enough to have copped the (rare) wax of this: please make sure you treat it well.


6. $tripper by Bicep


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In 2012, Techno wasn’t the only sound sweeping across the UK like some kind of giant musical Hurricane, 90s inspired House also saw a major resurgence in interest. Who better to help lead this than the Bicep boys - both of whom have been pushing the sound for a while now through their productions and blog. ‘$tripper’ captured the 90s House vibe to a tee - with its diva vocal cut, hi-hats, and bubbly synths. This is a sure fire party starter, so we do advise DJ’s to always keep a copy in their arsenal.


7. Ellipsis
by Joy Orbison


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Any year that Peter O’Grady releases something, be it solo or collaborative, it’s always going to feature highly at end of year lists - the guy is the very definition of innovator after all. Since debuting with the now classic ‘Hyph Mngo’ release on Hotflush back in 2009, O’Grady has continued to remain at the forefront of UK Electronic music, duly garnering wider acclaim in the process. Floating around for what seemed like an eternity, ‘Ellipsis,’ finally saw a release in 2012. It’s a euphoric anthem as it is - but when those piano stabs come in, it really does becomes something else again. Thank you Mr. O’Grady for making dance-floors a better place the world over.

8. Cactus
by Objekt


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Not a great deal is known about Berlin based producer, Objekt (aka TJ Hertz), but then - that isn’t really important. Hertz makes floor-weapons that rival anything in the mighty US military - with ‘Cactus’ the standard bearer. It’s nearly six minutes of floor annihilating prowess, with drums that hit hard, and wobble powerful enough to cause minor earth tremors. What more can we say? This track does not fuck around.

9.
Ne1butu by Scuba


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Much of Scuba’s Personality LP didn’t really gain that much traction from the crew here at GP - we just didn’t enjoy it as much as the excellent Triangulation. That said, ‘Ne1butu’ was definitely the exception - this euphoric little number had us dancing for days. It’s completely over the top - the vocal cuts are damn near verging on 90s Big beat cheese, and really it’s just plain ridiculous as a whole. But if this jam doesn’t make you want to get off your chair and dance, then we’re really not sure what will.


10. Rhythm Sektion by Lando Kal


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Lando Kal (legally known as Antaeus Roy) is a difficult producer to pigeonhole. Whether it’s his solo work or as one half of duo, Lazer Sword, Roy manages to switch up his productions effortlessly. It was a difficult decision between the Rhythm Sektion EP on Hotflush, and the equally stellar TMRW EP on Stillcold, but ultimately we decided upon the former. ‘Rhythm Sektion’ sounds like something that wouldn’t have been out of place in a 90s Detroit rave at an abandoned industrial site - and y’all know we’re a sucker for those kinda vibes. Be sure to spin this at your next neighborhood warehouse party.

Prone by Boddika & Joy Orbison



By now, you’ve probably seen a lot of Boddika and Joy O-related posts, so we’ll just cut to the chase. We were rather psyched on the last pair of tracks the pair released back in February (‘Mercy' in particular), so we were just as keen on the next set of tracks they had in store for us - and it duly delivers. In comparison to the hard-hitting flipside, 'Prone' takes things a little easier, with blurry synths, wooden drums and a titular vocal sample leading the way for much of the track. It's a nice little respite from the other three tunes that have surfaced thus far, and we're just as curious to see what the pair bring us for their next Sunklo outings. 

BRKLN CLLN by Joy Orbison



There are producers - and there’s Joy Orbison. ‘Hyph Mngo' heralded the beginning of the UK Bass scene as it is today, and is not just one of the most important electronic tracks, but of all genres to be released in the 00s. This release - while not quite as known as the former, is almost as incredible, and capped off what was a monumental year for the Londoner. But the real test of time? Despite coming out in late 2009, ‘BRKLN CLLN’ sounds just as relevant today - nearly three years on.

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